Rutgers Television Spot: "Before"

About the Spot

Rutgers is one of only nine colonial colleges established before the American Revolution, and this 30-second TV spot highlights Rutgers’ rich history and celebrates the university as a place of innovation, knowledge, and leadership in New Jersey and beyond. From the founding of Queen’s College in 1766 to breakthroughs in spinal cord injury research, Rutgers is a place with a revolutionary spirit.

Learn more about the featured topics, people, and events:

Learn more about the featured topics, people, and events:

 

History of Rutgers History of Rutgers
Chartered in 1766 as Queen's College, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is the nation's eighth oldest institution of higher learning and is one of only nine colonial colleges established before the American Revolution. While it began with one instructor and a handful of students, Rutgers now has three main locations—in New Brunswick, Newark, and Camden—and serves nearly 50,000 students.
Colonel Henry Rutgers Colonel Henry Rutgers
In 1825, Queen's College became Rutgers College to honor trustee and Revolutionary War veteran Colonel Henry Rutgers. Colonel Rutgers' affiliation with Old Queen's dated back to 1815, when he became a trustee. Later, he donated the college bell, which still hangs in the Old Queen's building, and also made a financial gift. More about the university's history can be found on the timeline.
The Birthplace of College Football The Birthplace of College Football
The first intercollegiate football game took place between Rutgers and Princeton on November 6, 1869, on a field at the site of the present-day gym on Rutgers' College Avenue Campus in New Brunswick. Rutgers won 6-4.
The 2006 Louisville Victory The 2006 Louisville Victory
The eyes of the nation turned to the Rutgers football team when it achieved a stunning victory against the undefeated Louisville Cardinals on November 9, 2006. The win was Rutgers' first against a ranked opponent since 1988 and marked the most wins at that point in a season since 1978. The team finished the season 11-2 overall, including the school's first bowl championship with a victory over Kansas State in the inaugural Texas Bowl.
The Breakthrough Antibiotic The Breakthrough Antibiotic
In 1943, while working in a Rutgers lab, faculty member and alumnus Dr. Selman A. Waksman and graduate student Albert Schatz discovered streptomycin, which was the first antibiotic effective against tuberculosis. Proceeds from the Waksman-Schatz streptomycin patent, awarded in 1948, helped establish the Waksman Institute of Microbiology at Rutgers. In 1952, Waksman was awarded the Nobel Prize.
Alumna Julia Baxter Bates Alumna Julia Baxter Bates
The first African-American student admitted to New Jersey College for Women, now known as Douglass Residential College, Julia Baxter Bates was head of research at the NAACP for two decades. There, she worked with powerful civil rights leaders Justice Thurgood Marshall and W.E.B. DuBois. Her research directly influenced Supreme Court rulings against discrimination, including Brown v. Board of Education, which declared school segregation unconstitutional.
Wise Young Wise Young
This Rutgers professor is recognized as one of the world's foremost neuroscientists. In addition to receiving numerous awards for his scholarly work, Time magazine called Dr. Wise Young "America's Best" in the field of spinal cord injury research. He is also founding director of the W.M. Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience at Rutgers, known for its work on brain and spinal cord injury and its innovative stem cell research.
History of Rutgers
History of Rutgers
Chartered in 1766 as Queen's College, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is the nation's eighth oldest institution of higher learning and is one of only nine colonial colleges established before the American Revolution. While it began with one instructor and a handful of students, Rutgers now has three main locations—in New Brunswick, Newark, and Camden—and serves nearly 50,000 students.
Colonel Henry Rutgers
Colonel Henry Rutgers
In 1825, Queen's College became Rutgers College to honor trustee and Revolutionary War veteran Colonel Henry Rutgers. Colonel Rutgers' affiliation with Old Queen's dated back to 1815, when he became a trustee. Later, he donated the college bell, which still hangs in the Old Queen's building, and also made a financial gift. More about the university's history can be found on the timeline.
The Birthplace of College Football
The Birthplace of College Football
The first intercollegiate football game took place between Rutgers and Princeton on November 6, 1869, on a field at the site of the present-day gym on Rutgers' College Avenue Campus in New Brunswick. Rutgers won 6-4.
The 2006 Louisville Victory
The 2006 Louisville Victory
The eyes of the nation turned to the Rutgers football team when it achieved a stunning victory against the undefeated Louisville Cardinals on November 9, 2006. The win was Rutgers' first against a ranked opponent since 1988 and marked the most wins at that point in a season since 1978. The team finished the season 11-2 overall, including the school's first bowl championship with a victory over Kansas State in the inaugural Texas Bowl.
The Breakthrough Antibiotic
The Breakthrough Antibiotic
In 1943, while working in a Rutgers lab, faculty member and alumnus Dr. Selman A. Waksman and graduate student Albert Schatz discovered streptomycin, which was the first antibiotic effective against tuberculosis. Proceeds from the Waksman-Schatz streptomycin patent, awarded in 1948, helped establish the Waksman Institute of Microbiology at Rutgers. In 1952, Waksman was awarded the Nobel Prize.
Alumna Julia Baxter Bates
Alumna Julia Baxter Bates
The first African-American student admitted to New Jersey College for Women, now known as Douglass Residential College, Julia Baxter Bates was head of research at the NAACP for two decades. There, she worked with powerful civil rights leaders Justice Thurgood Marshall and W.E.B. DuBois. Her research directly influenced Supreme Court rulings against discrimination, including Brown v. Board of Education, which declared school segregation unconstitutional.
Wise Young
Wise Young
This Rutgers professor is recognized as one of the world's foremost neuroscientists. In addition to receiving numerous awards for his scholarly work, Time magazine called Dr. Wise Young "America's Best" in the field of spinal cord injury research. He is also founding director of the W.M. Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience at Rutgers, known for its work on brain and spinal cord injury and its innovative stem cell research.

“Before" Script

Before there was a United States, a college was founded in the heart of New Jersey.

Before there were bowl games, the first college football game was played at Rutgers.

Before there were cures for tuberculosis, Rutgers scientists discovered the breakthrough antibiotic.

Before the Supreme Court’s landmark ruling, a Rutgers alumna helped make the case for desegregation.

Before the world changes again—Rutgers will be working on it.

Rutgers. Jersey Roots, Global Reach.